Dear Black Cultural Center Naming Committee and UO President Schill,

Thank you for your continued support of the Umoja Academic Residential Community. We write this letter in support of naming the prospective Black Cultural Center the Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center.

Lyllye B. Parker is a keystone of the African American community in the city of Eugene. She was born into the first black family to live in this city. Throughout her entire life she has been paving the way for black people in this state just by going places we were not allowed. She was born at Eugene Sacred Heart Hospital before it was legal for African Americans to be there. She was the first black student to graduate from Sheldon High School and has dedicated her life to building a supportive network of black people within Eugene.

Lyllye went through her education alone so black students today don't have to. She worked as an academic advisor at the Office of Multicultural Academic Success, for 16 years. Lyllye supported students from underrepresented backgrounds to achieve in an environment that often undervalued and overlooked them. Her commitment to equality goes beyond this university she was also a Member of the Congress of Racial Equality, and appointed as a member of the Lane County commission for the Advancement of Human Rights.

The Black Cultural Center is the embodiment of the values she has worked towards. The Black Cultural Center is designed to be a place where the black experience is valued and supported. It will provide a safe space where black students don’t experience the loneliness and racism that often participates in environments that lack the richness of diversity. The Black Cultural Center is about giving a home to this school’s Black Community, who better to name it after than the first black women to make this city her home.

We the Umoja Academic Residential Community request that because of all the accolades mentioned and the continued support of Lyllye B. Parker for the Black Community in Eugene, that you make an exception to the posthumous rule and name the Black Cultural Center after the courageous, Lyllye B. Parker.

Sincerely,

Umoja Academic Residential Community 

2019-20 Academic School Year Cohort

Bailey Adams, Ellis Mimms, Ashley Turrell, Semeredin Kudin, Jared Giles, Miracle Barber, Halston Harper, Serenate Fletcher, Adryana White, Payton Hines-Norwood, Tamera Jordan, Philicia Robinson

The spelling of Lyllye’s name was corrected in this document.


Dear President Shill,

The African Students’ Association wants to thank you for your support in helping to create a more welcoming UO for many black students. Indeed, we are very grateful for how far we have come from three years ago. This has showed us that there is room to make black (and all) students feel safe at the UO.

Even though not all the grievances and demands by the Black Student Task Force were addressed, which to this day greatly bothers many students, the university agreed to have the Black Cultural Center.

The purpose of the Black cultural Center is to provide a community of comfort, care and safety for the university's black students since Oregon and the country as a whole has a history and still a current issue of intimidating, persecuting and discriminating against black people based on the color of their skin.

At the Black Cultural Center, we would like black (and students) to feel welcomed and safe as a form of acceptance, whoever they are. For this reason we would like to name the Black Cultural Center after a woman is notable for her commitment to promoting equity and justice for black people in this state, Lyllye B. Parker.

Ms. Parker has been a strong foundation which has held the Eugene black community together. She has continuously provided support for black students in higher education, this is applaudable, as at times, we do not feel a sense of belonging at higher institutions. Her charisma, courage, and love is what we want embodied at the Black Cultural Center. Therefore it is right that we name the Black Cultural Center after her.

We believe naming the Black Cultural Center-The Lyllye B. Parker is a way of showing the university's commitment to activism and equity and we look forward to having university were students feel more represented and heard.

Sincerely,

UO African Students’ Association.


To Whom This May Concern,

Hope all is well. I write this letter of support as a black woman in addition to being a student at the University of Oregon. The Black Culture Center is much more than just a building. It’s a space on campus where black students can feel safe as well as strongly supported. It’s a symbol of empowerment, community, and commitment to advancing the culture here on campus. As the Black Culture Center will represent all these momentous symbols. The naming of the Black Culture Center is vital in fully committing to the Black Culture Center.

It’s with considerable honor that I stand in support with not only the Black Student Task Force but various Black students. In supporting the service, honor, and support of naming the Black Culture Center after the legendary Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker.

She has a stupendous record of leadership and has committed to advancing the justice and equality for black people in Oregon. She has strongly voiced the importance for the pursuit of advancement as well as knowledge in higher education. Her own work has led to a more inclusive and equitable UO here on campus. She has helped black students in addition to the community members in achieve success in higher education and emphasized the importance of pursuit of careers. She has worked to demonstrate evidence of overcoming oppression and discrimination in addition to her work that has led to achievements of not only extraordinary but a lasting distinction. Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker exceeds all the criteria for naming a building in addition to her advancing the values and mission of the university.

This would not only be an impactful choice but also very inspiring to not only current Black students but also incoming Black students especially after the decision to not rename Deady Hall and the negative impact it left on many black students. Once again, I reiterate the importance in addition to my full support in naming the Black Culture Center after the legendary Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker. Thank you!

Best Regards, 

Sabinna Pierre

2019 – 2020 ASUO President

541.346.0624 | asuopres@uoregon.edu | 1395 University Street Suite 004, Eugene, OR 97403


June 19, 2019

Dear President Schill/BCC Naming Committee:

My name is Stephanie Tabibian and I come from Duck Valley Indian Reservation, located on the boarder of Nevada and Idaho. I am a Shoshone-Paiute tribal member and the first person from my tribe to graduate from the University of Oregon. I grew up attending a K-12 tribal school, with an average of 20 children per class. Our reservation has around 1,000 residents and we are 100 miles from the nearest city north and south. I came to Eugene in fall 2009 with the goal of earning a degree and succeeding in a place where no one in my tribe has ever been. What I thought would be easy, was extremely challenging as I experienced severe culture shock once I began attending the University of Oregon.

By the end of my second year I could not get out of bed for my spring term finals. I accepted that my college journey was over, and I was going home. I accepted that no one at the University of Oregon really cared about me or if I continued pursuing an education. One day a co-director in the Native American Student Union told me she would take me to Aunt Lyllye, and that everything was going to be ok. I had no idea who she was referencing or where we were going. I followed her the Office of Multicultural Academic Success (OMAS), and we walked through an open office door to see Miss Lyllye Parker. That day changed my life, as the woman behind the desk got up to hug me and hold me while I cried. From that point forward Miss Lyllye called me every couple of days. She ate lunch with me once a week, and she found me a culturally competent tutor who helped me identify test anxiety triggers in mathematics. Recalling this time of my life continues to make me emotional to this day, as I recall feeling so alone and vulnerable.

I know I am not the only to praise the love and support I received from this angel, my academic advisor, Miss Lyllye Parker. She became my family while I was away from my tribe. After 5.5 long years, I received my bachelor’s degree. A year after graduation I was recruited to serve as the UO Native American Retention Specialist, a position I served in for nearly 4 years. I had the honor of beginning my career in Miss Lyllye’s office and I sat at her exact desk. I mentored students who sat where I sat for years. In many appointments I found myself providing the same holistic advising I received from her, and I shared words of wisdom that were shared with me in that office.

Post-graduation I have been successful in building Native American Retention programming on this campus, and I can contribute much of my perseverance to Miss Lyllye. I now serve as the Sapsik'ʷałá (Teacher) Education Program Coordinator for the UO College of Education, and am pursuing a Master’s in Community in Regional Planning. This fall two more Shoshone-Paiute tribal members will be attending the UO and living in Native American & Indigenous Studies Academic Residential Community (NAIS ARC), a ARC I co-proposed and helped bring to fruition. I am sharing my story and the impact of my work with you because it began the day I walked into Miss Lyllye Parker’s office. I am writing this letter in support of naming the Black Cultural Center after a African American Matriarch from this community. I hope to walk past the Black Cultral Center one day and tell my son, this building is named after Aunt Lyllye Parker, a woman that helped many of us in the UO Native American student community. Thank you for your consideration of my request.

Respectfully,

Stephanie Tabibian


June 11, 2019

Black Cultural Center Naming Committee:

This letter is in support of the naming of the Black Cultural Center. I strongly support that the Center be named after my academic advisor and mentor, Lyllye B. Parker. The Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center, if so named, will be most deserving of Ms. Parker.

Upon my arrival in Eugene, Oregon in the summer of June 2007, it was Mrs. Lyllye Parker who introduced me to a space on campus where I could get help to acclimate to what was a very cold climate. To this day, the Office of Multicultural Academic Success (OMAS), now known as the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (CMAE) is my safe Haven on the UO Campus. As an Assistant Director for Scholarships, I work very close with the academic advisors in CMAE.

In addition to offering her support of social justice in and around the Eugene/Springfield communities, Ms. Parker continues to unite multiple communities of color and otherwise. Over the nine years of our friendship, I have witness Ms. Parker support, motivate and advocate for a myriad of equity and social causes. In her pursuit of advocacy, I have also seen the unjust treatment by members of the University community towards Mrs. Parker. In her defense, Mrs. Parker exemplifies the mean of change and social advocacy. Even in retirement, Ms. Parker continues to support the people of this community at every phase of their personal and academic lives.

I have personally witnessed her as she embraced her students, at every level, of this institution. As a supporter of academic excellence, it was under her direction that I decided to pursue my career as a master student; her support was unfaltering throughout my pursuit and receipt of my MA Ed degree. A catalyst for change in our local community, I support the Black Student Task Force (BSTF) List of Demands (which the Black Cultural Center arised from Demand #7). Additionally, I share their vision and support their efforts to name the Black Cultural Center the Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center.

In addition to meeting the criteria that you all have announced I submit the following reasons for my support for Mrs. Parker:

  • Continuous activism for underserved populations
  • Dedication to an inclusive environment despite social class, gender, race etc.

With utmost respect, I request for you to accept my nomination of support in the naming of The Black Cultural Center: Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center.

Holli Johnson-Keeton

Assistant Director - Scholarships

Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships 1278 University of Oregon | Eugene, OR 97403 Direct: (541) 346-1199 |C: (503) 621-2253

E: hollij@uoregon.edu | Web: https://financialaid.uoregon.edu/


The Women's Center -The University of Oregon

April 29, 2019

Dear President Schill,

I am thrilled to write this Letter of Support on behalf of the upcoming Black Cultural Center on the University of Oregon campus. As the Director of the Women's Center, members of the Black Student Task Force approached me recently to share their hope and vision for this powerful and symbolic monument to Black Students and our entire campus community. I wholeheartedly support their request to name the Black Cultural Center after the legendary Ms. Lyllye B. Parker.

The University of Oregon Women's Center has held the annual Lyllye B. Parker Womxn of  Color Speaker Series, named to honor the legacy and work of Ms. Lyllye B. Parker beginning with its inaugural event in 2011 featuring Dr. Angela Davis, to address the intersections of racism, sexism and other systems of  oppression that Womxn of Color face on individual, institutional and societal levels. We proudly celebrated our ninth year holding this event on April 2, 2019 to a full house of students and staff from a wide variety of intersecting identities and lived experiences.

Coming from one of the first African American families to settle in Eug ene, Ms. Lyllye was told in high school that her only career options were to be a hairdresser, a nurse or to pursue Home Economics. Going against the advice of that high school guidance counselor, Ms. Parker went back to school in her 40s to earn her Bachelor's Degree. Ms. Parker earned a degree in Sociology at the University of Oregon and upon graduating she accepted a position as an Academic Advisor in the Office of Multicultural Academic Support (OMAS) now the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (CMAE). In her 17 years at OMAS, she mentored hundreds of young Students of Color to pursue their dreams. To this day, Ms. Parker continues to give back to the Lane County community through her volunteer work and loving advocacy.

Ms. Parker has a wealth of students who attribute their empowerment and subsequent success to her mentorship and support. Each year Ms. Parker joins my Women's Center Student Staff and I to share her story, to provide academic encouragement and to remind them of their inherent value and worth as humans worthy of dignity and respect. And each year my students are left in complete awe. Ms. Parker is a force of nature, a tremendous role model and someone I have personally and professionally become so proud to know and honor each year.

It is with great sincerity and enthusiasm that I support the naming of the University of Oregon Black Cultural Center after Ms. Lyllye B. Parker as I have no doubt that her years of commitment to our students and our campus community will continue to be a transformative force in the world.

I appreciate your consideration.

Sincerely,

Fatima Roohi Pervaiz, MLS 

Director, UO Women's Center 

The University of Oregon

541.346.4095 I womenctr@uore gon .edu I dos.uoregon.edu/women EMU Room 012 - 1395 University Street, Eugene, OR 97403 - 1395


Dear President Schill,

I am writing in support of the decision taken by the University of Oregon’s(UO) Black Students Task Force and Law Students Association to request that the Black Cultural Center be named after Eugene, Oregon native, Mrs. Lyllye Parker.

As a 2018 graduate of UO Law, I will also like to acknowledge and commend your continued commitment to ensuring that the University of Oregon community will equitably provide all students with the tools they deserve, in order to obtain a well-rounded education.

Mrs. Lyllye Parker was born under exceptional circumstances; as a black baby in a “white only” hospital in Eugene, Oregon in 1946. Nonetheless, Mrs. Parker has and continues to live a life of exceptional leadership. It is often said that leaders must be judged by the impact they have on the lives of the people they serve. Because of her exceptional ability to overcome oppression and discrimination, her numerous achievements in service of the local and UO communities, as well as her continuous positive impact on the lives of black people and black students in Oregon, Mrs. Parker deserves the honor of having the Black Student Cultural Center named after her.

A study of history is important lest we forget the fruits of the past. Additionally, we must also use history to liberate ourselves and design the future we envision. If you choose to weigh lightly the posthumous factor in this exceptional circumstance, you will demonstrate the UO’s commitment to using history not only as a reminder but also as a tool for liberation and design.

Certainly, naming or renaming any one building is in no way the end of your commitment journey to the cause of equity and inclusion on campus. On the contrary, naming the Black Student Center after Mrs. Lyllye Parker will play a big part in making sure that journey never comes to an end.

Yours Respectfully,

Fon Akenji 

05/22/19

The spelling of Lyllye’s name was corrected in this document.


Dear UO President Schill and Black Cultural Center Naming Committee,

On behalf of Black Male Alliance, I am writing this letter in support of the Black Student Task Force’s wish to name the future Black Cultural Center naming after Mrs. Lyllye Parker. It is the excellent opportunity to not only honor a Black woman who faced academic endeavors but later achieved educational success. Mrs. Parker’s civil service, commitment to academic success of UO’s underrepresented community has been a critical reason we (as a community and university) has come this far today. Her 17 years of work was always centered on the future of our university. Essentially, she centered her work for the benefit of the Black students that are here today. Too often Black women go unappreciated in this country. Nevertheless, Black women are the backbone of any movement for equity and equality that Black people in America have put together. It important that we acknowledge and thank them. In particular, it is important for us to acknowledge and honor Black women while they are still alive. We urge you all to not miss out on this opportunity and honor Mrs. Parker.

Unlike any time before, the University of Oregon has an opportunity to be ahead of the academic curve and create a precedent that will lead others to honoring esteemed living icon like Mrs. Parker. Additionally, honoring Mrs. Parker will let the Black citizens of Eugene know we appreciate and admire their perseverance and willingness to welcome Black student (and other underrepresented groups) into the community.

Mrs. Parker is the definition of a survivor and courageous leader. From the time she was born as the first Black woman in this very city’s hospital to the countless times she worked on this campus, making a difference to innumerable student’s lives, we believe it is overdue to honor her. Honoring her properly so her name and legacy shall live on through the Black Cultural Center.

Women like Mrs. Parker that leave a long lasting impacts on the lives of people who will change the future do not come often. Moreover, the opportunities to acknowledge and honor the insurmountable success they have had in their lives, when they can see it, does not often happen. So now, more than ever, we as the Duck community need to come together to make the most of this tremendous opportunity. With distinct honor, our organization, the Black Male Alliance, nominate our patriarch, Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker, to have the distinct honor, yet befitting honor of naming the UO Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center.

With Power,

Noori Cherry, Black Male Alliance, President 

Kobe Dumas, Black Male Alliance, Vice-President


President Schill,

On behalf of the Black Student Union, we are writing this letter in support of the Black Student Task Force’s motion to name the new Black Cultural Center after Mrs. Lyllye Parker. This is an opportunity for the university to commemorate an influential member of the Black community here in Eugene. Black women are not given enough credit where it is due, and it is far past that time. In addition, the University of Oregon has a moment that will last forever to expose its commitment and support for the Black community by naming the BCC after a true Eugene citizen. Mrs. Lyllye Parker was the first Black woman to be born in this city’s hospital. To add to that, she is still alive. We are fortunate enough for this once in a lifetime chance to commemorate a Black woman who is a first, and still amongst us. Her contributions to Eugene and for the Black community are leaps and bounds from remarkable.

As all of the Black Student organizations unite together for this naming, we have gained a great amount of respect for the woman who has walked so that we could run. As students of the University of Oregon, the Black Cultural Center is an impactful gain. As Black Students at the University of Oregon, naming the Black Cultural Center after Lyllye Parker is an even greater one.

With Power,

The University of Oregon Black Student Union


President Schill,

First, thank you for your continued commitment to working with us to help the University of Oregon better serve Black students. We truly appreciate your time and willingness to engage in continued, valuable discourse with us. Even when some of our the dialogues have been emotionally charged and entailed some points of demur, your forefront leadership and civility have continued to empower our vision of the List of Demands and hopes of making the UO one of the most diverse, premiere academic institutions.

We are hereby writing to express our vision for the namesake of the Black Cultural Center. In this case, we request that you strongly consider making an exception to the posthumous rule for naming buildings so that we can name the new Black Cultural Center after the legendary Lyllye Parker. We believe hers is an exceptional case that not just meets, but far exceeds all the other criteria and would be particularly inspiring to incoming Black (and all) students. Also, it would be an opportunity for the UO to demonstrate to the rest of the state how to be flexible and forward thinking in efforts to better serve underserved students, especially after the decision to not rename Deady Hall disappointed so many.

According to an Around the O article from last year discussing the process in naming Unthank Hall, the additional criteria for naming a building besides posthumous recognition and advancing the values and mission of the university, are to honor someone:

  • Who has made significant contributions in service, support or honor to the UO or to the state of Oregon.
  • Who has an extraordinary record of leadership and commitment to advancing justice and equity for black people in Oregon.
  • Who has demonstrated evidence of overcoming oppression and discrimination.
  • Who strongly advocated for the pursuit of knowledge and advancement of higher education.
  • Whose own work has led to an inclusive and equitable UO campus.
  • Whose work has led to achievements of extraordinary and lasting distinction.
  • Who has helped black students or community members achieve success in higher education and the pursuit of careers.

In that article, you were quoted as saying, “This physical space is a reminder to us all that this extraordinary man overcame racial discrimination as a child in Portland as well as discrimination and overt acts of hatred at the University of Oregon.” On top of that, in a related Daily Emerald article, you said, “I think ahead to the freshmen who will eagerly unpack belongings into Unthank Hall and who will be inspired by this tremendous man to make their own lasting impact on our university, state, and nation.”

The fact is, the implications of naming the Black Cultural Center after Mrs. Parker are just as important and would have the potential to be just as, if not more inspiring. It can’t be reiterated enough that she not only embodies all of the aforementioned criteria for this honor, but exceeds it by leaps and bounds.

Even before she was born, equity, inclusion, perseverance and societal justice were constants in Mrs. Parker’s familial lineage. Mrs. Parker is the daughter of Sam and “Mother” Mattie Reynolds. Sam Reynolds Sr., a champion of equality and patriarch of the first African-American family to settle in Lane County, is the namesake of Sam Reynolds St. and the Sam Reynolds EMX Station on West 11th. Mattie Reynolds was a civil rights activist, founding member of St. Mark Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, the first African-American to seek elected office in Eugene (vying for a seat on the City Council in 1966) and a prominent member of the Eugene chapter of the Congress for Racial Equality, which challenged housing and job discrimination similar to what she and her family continued to experience yet persevered through.

Mrs. Parker’s story is just as inspirational. She has been overcoming the obstacles of racism literally since birth. Her mother had to sneak into Eugene’s Sacred Heart Hospital because it was illegal for African Americans to be born there (and to this day, is the reason Mrs. Parker is listed as “Caucasian-White” on her birth certificate despite obviously being African American). While she holds distinctions as the first African American to be born in Eugene and as a member of the first graduating class of Sheldon High School, it’s what she did later in life that has gone on to inspire so many, starting with entering the UO as a true freshman at the age of 40 in 1986. She went on to serve as an academic advisor for 16 years in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success, where she became one of the most beloved personalities on campus. Generations of students genuinely see her as family and still talk about the positive impact she has had on their lives. Furthermore, she has served as a past resident of the historical Mims House, member of the Congress of Racial Equality, and was appointed as a board member of the Lane County Commission for the Advancement of Human Rights. Mrs. Parker is also the namesake of the Lyllye B. Parker Women of Color Speaker Series.

With all this in mind, the UO Black Student Task Force has unanimously agreed that the new Black Cultural Center should be named the Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center. She is a tremendous representative of the UO, African Americans, and humanity as a whole, and we believe it would be a missed opportunity for the UO not to seize this moment to honor her contributions.

Once again, we appreciate your time and hope you take this recommendation into strong consideration.

We understand the importance of an equitable decision making process, appreciate your forefront leadership and commitment to diversity, and look forward to having this historical building named after one of our Eugene and UO pioneers, Mrs. Parker.

Please let us know if you have any questions. 

University of Oregon Black Student Task Force


Dear Black Cultural Center Naming Committee:

This letter is in support for Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker as the namesake of the forthcoming University of Oregon Black Cultural Center. It is an honor to nominate Mrs. Parker.

I have known Ms. Parker since I came to Eugene 16 years ago as a freshman in college. She helped me navigate my way through school during some of the most difficult and trying times of my life. She is special to me because she dealt with me in such a way that I could feel that she cared for me beyond just my academic success in higher education, she cared for my success in life. She is the reason I earned my degree and found my academic and career passion.

In addition to her paving the way for me in academic matters Mrs. Parker and I often frequented cultural events together. On various occasions, the cultural events we frequented did not necessarily have to do with academics. Nevertheless, they were always a learning opportunity/events. Knowledge that I made sure to bring back to our campus.

When I was within the vicinity of Mrs. Parker, I always knew and felt wanted and validated. The second that she see’s me, she would always make it a point to come to me, say hello, check on me and give me a hug. Her nurturing spirit and general concern made her like family to me. There isn’t anything I would not do for Mrs. Parker. Mrs. Parker is a courageous and visionary individual. Because of her unwavering commitment to helping me get my degree showing me how to become a better person, along with the 17 years of service she has given to University of Oregon students, naming the Black Cultural Center after Mrs. Parker is a small token of thank you that I undoubtedly believe she merits. I am absolutely certain there are countless students, staff, faculty, alumni and community members that would concur with me. With this said, I highly recommend that the Black Cultural Center be named after Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker.

Sincerely,

Andiel Brown

Director of University of Oregon Gospel Choirs & Ensembles 

Room 128 School of Music and Dance

(541) 346-3792


Dear University of Oregon President Michael H. Schill and Black Cultural Center Naming Committee,

It is with great honor that I write this Letter to nominate Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker for the University of Oregon Black Cultural Center Namesake. A first generation University of Oregon (UO) college student, Mrs. Parker earned a Minor in Women and Gender Studies and Bachelor of Arts in Sociology in 1991. Subsequently Mrs. Parker served as the Academic Advisor/Advising Coordinator in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success (currently called Center of Multicultural Academic Success) from 1995-2012. However, the abovementioned information, does not sufficiently explain Mrs. Parker’s positive impact on humanity and overall journey. Mrs. Parker’s journey is a testament of perseverance, advocacy for equity/equality, courage, and civility. The same attributes her parents, Eugene, Oregon Civil Rights icons, Sam and Maddie Reynolds, personified, instilled into Mrs. Parker and helped her bring light through the dark and tumultuous times of state of Oregon and city of Eugene.

My academic voyage is one of many ups and downs. It is also one of luck. Bad luck due to lack of financial stability and lack of knowledge about a university. And good luck because I was able to meet Mrs. Parker, get continuous help from her and see my fortune turn into a reality of graduation.

Mrs. Parker was not only my academic advisor; she is an individual that I (and many other African-American students) look up to and seek advice from regarding scholarship, academic research initiatives, and other life-changing decisions we have to make.

During her time in the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (CMAE), (formerly known as Office of Multicultural Academic Success-OMAS), Mrs. Parker fully embraced her duties and utilized her experience, knowledge, passion, and resources to the benefit and progress of every student she has worked with. As an undergraduate, I knew it was important to graduate. However, I, along with many other undergraduates, wasn't sure where my education would lead me. I did however, know that I wanted to help others gain access to a university. In particular, I became interested in helping those who lack resources and encouragement to attend a four-year academic institution. In retrospect, though I wanted to help others gain access to education, I was trying to figure out if can actually graduate college myself (I am a first generation college student). Witnessing Mrs. Parkers’s investment in helping students, I found the level of trust needed to tell her about my predicament. Mrs. Parker, like the tremendous advisor that she was, not only reassured that I would graduate, she worked hand in hand with me, continuously edits my research papers, helped me gain the confidence/ to become a Diversity Excellence Scholarship recipient.

Since I entered the UO in fall 2006, I have seen Mrs. Parker champion equity and inclusion through various avenues. She has been an unyielding supporter for student leadership and education advancement initiatives. She has also taken a forefront leadership by advising and providing grassroots outreach to various socioeconomically and ethically underrepresented UO, high school, and middle school students. One of the Mrs. Parkers grassroots outreach was a program named “Reach For Success”. Reach for Success is an interactive campus visitation program for traditionally underrepresented 7th and 8th grade students. At this day long program, students have the opportunity to have a tangible college experience by interacting with UO student/staff/faculty that identify as they do, and ultimately (hopefully) debunking the myth that education is not attainable/worthy of pursuing. Mrs. Parker did not only successfully execute this program, she worked hard/convinced the UO administration/students that they should support it, and created this program herself. Currently, Reach for Success is a Division of Equity & Inclusion (DEI) based program that is held yearly on our campus. As a result, UO student/populace can see and experience Mrs. Parker’s success and enduring legacy.

As aforementioned, I began UO in Fall 2006. However, I graduated in 2013. My graduation timeline is certainly not the timeline of the typical college student. It was also not the journey of the typical college student. I dropped out twice because of financial and self-doubt reasons. Despite my status as a dropout and overall roller-coaster experience, Mrs. Parker never left my side. She checked on me daily. Reminded me of the importance of an education. Continuously urged me to complete my education. She did not only urge me to get back campus and complete my education, she helped me through each step. FAFSA application, scholarship search, letter of support to the academic readmission committee, and continued assurance that I will be successful. Mrs. Parker was there for me every step of the way. To this day, she checks on me and makes sure I am doing well and helping others in need (I am currently the lead Accountant Representative for Nike-National Football League).

Mrs. Parker has had a lifelong commitment to the ideals and motto (Minds Move Mountain) of our university. To this day, she makes herself available, advices, helps, and challenges her students to give back to our university/community and help those in need. Mrs. Parker does all of this for me/her former students with an inspirational and healthy dose of humility. A humility that everyone that steps a foot on/has ever heard of the UO would be proud of.

The aforementioned examples are some of (the many) ways Mrs. Parker, has contributed to the UO and put into place programs that will continuously help the UO (and state of Oregon) underrepresented population. The aforementioned examples information are also examples of how Mrs. Parker'ss work/contribution to UO/overall humanity fits the criteria of the Black Cultural Center naming.

Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker is an epitome of what a human being, especially those who am to be higher education leaders, should be. It is with gratitude and humility that I nominate, and hope, that the UO Black Cultural Center namesake will be the Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center.

Thank you, 

Devin Harvey

Bachelors of Science in Human Physiology

UO Class of 2013

Email: iamdevinharvey@gmail.com


Dear President Schill,

Today I write in support and kindly ask for your consideration to name the Black Cultural Arts Center after Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker. I am a former Black Student Union President and ASUO Multicultural Advocate that participated in the advocacy that resulted in the departmentalization of the Ethnic Studies Department. I contextualize this missive as the current mobilization of the Black Student Task Force has evolved (formerly known as the Black Alliance Leadership Team) from a long history and intentional development of Black student leaders to make their campus community accessible and inclusive in addition to successful matriculation to become outstanding community leaders and professionals in their chosen professions.

It is without a doubt that this advocacy and student mobilization has been inspired by the life and legacy of Miss Lyllye B. Parker. I began my time with the University as a sophomore transfer student in fall of 2005. As a first-generation college student, I found the walls of the ivory tower unfamiliar and challenging to navigate. If it were not for the support of Mrs. Parker to provide scholarship recommendations a listening ear and a reminder that my first purpose was to receive a diploma, I am not sure how I would have made it through the six years I spent completing my undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Upon completion of my master’s degree I began working as the Director of Diversity Education and Support in the Office of the Dean of Students. Mrs. Parker now a colleague still was one of my most trusted mentors and inspired the ways in which I worked primarily with self-identified students of color; particularly those in the Black Student Union, the Black Women of Achievement and the Intercultural Mentoring Program Advancing Community Ties. Mrs. Parker’s teachings contributed to the success the latter program received by Black students’ graduation and retention rates surpassing the institutional average by 30%.

As the first Black baby born at Sacred Heart Hospital, Mrs. Parker knows firsthand the challenges of overcoming discrimination. Her mother had to sneak into Eugene’s Sacred Heart Hospital because it was illegal for African Americans to be born there (and to this day, is the reason Mrs. Parker is listed as “Caucasian-White” on her birth certificate despite obviously being African American).

Her trajectory as a barrier breaker continued in 1986 as she began pursuit of her bachelor degree as a nontraditional student at the age of forty. Mrs. Parker has turned her pain into promise inspiring hundreds of students and community members alike in her service, support to honor the UO and significant contributions in academic advising and beyond.

While many African American leaders in Oregon are concentrated in Portland, Mrs. Parker and the legacy of her family are a reminder that representation undoubtedly matters in an area where the Black population is less than 2%. Despite these challenges, Mrs. Parker has not only improved the conditions of Black students and community members to achieve success in higher education and beyond she is also beloved amongst many other students in other communities due to her keen ability to reach across cultural barriers to unify all.

I cannot think of a more deserving candidate to have been given the consideration to receive the significant honor of having the Black Cultural Arts Center boast her namesake. So much of our success is rooted in Mrs. Parkers lived experiences overcoming oppression and discrimination and deep commitment to advancing justice and equity for Black people in Oregon.

Thank you for your time and consideration for this important distinction.

Sincerely,

Kari M. Herinckx

BA ’08 Bed ‘09, MEd ‘11

Former Miss Black Oregon

The spelling of Lyllye’s name was corrected in this document.


October 4, 2018 

President Schill,

Thank you for your leadership acknowledging and validating the unique and diverse experiences and contributions of Black students on the University of Oregon campus. The creation of the Black Cultural Center is a statement that displays the administration’s evolution and inclusion of diversity.

As a 1996 University of Oregon graduate and previous Black Student Union (BSU) president, I remember Lylle B. Parker’s contribution and support as an Office of Multicultural Affairs Academic Advisor for my academic success. Mrs. Parker was also a mentor to the Black Student Union for cultural and education events. Mrs. Parker brought her unique family and individual experience as a non-traditional University of Oregon graduate and being a member from one of the first black families in Lane County.

Mrs. Parker’s influence and social capital from the community was instrumental in supporting black students navigate non-inclusive systems thrive in an adverse non diverse racial climate. Growing up in Lane county. Lylle B. Parker displays a sense of respect, compassion, equality and equity and embodies Cultural Humility with her lifelong process of continued learning, community connections and involvement with cultural differences (Tervalon & Murray-Garcia, 88).

Mrs. Parker is an activist who is active standing with others over disparities in health care systems when someone is experiencing injustice with service of care. She is an amazing mother who is very supportive of her son and her daughter, who preceded her spiritual evolution. Mrs. Parker is momma to many and treats youth with the same regard she shows her own.

The UO Women's Center continues to recognize Mrs. Parker's contribution as a woman of color that was on staff supporting the diversity of women on campus and the community with the Lyllye B. Parker Womyn of Color Speaker Series that began in 2011 as the Lyllye B. Parker conference.

Let's honor this great woman, her experience, her living legacy in this moment by naming the Black Cultural Center with the Lyllye B. Parker namesake. Thank you for considering my request.

Kenya Luvert, 96 

University of Oregon,

School of Journalism, Public Relations


From: David K. Spencer 

3955 15th Ave South

St. Petersburg, FL 33711

To: President Michael Schill 

1300 University Ave

Eugene, Or 97401

Re: Lylle B. Parker Black Cultural Center 

Dear Mr. Schill,

My name is David Spencer and I am writing to show my support for the University’s consideration of naming its recent groundbreaking after one of the most influential educators that has shared the halls of the University of Oregon. While I know that Mrs. Lylle Parker was not a professor, nor did she teach any formal university courses, she educated the students who sat in her office in the art and science of life.

I have known Mrs. Parker since I was a young man. She was a good friend of my mother. Mrs. Parker and my mother shared a close friendship. She was known for her smile and her voice that could take over a room and always commanded attention. She was also known as a beautiful singer. Many days in my youth she sang in St. Marks CME church. A well-known church in the Eugene area.

Mrs. Parker was the first person who took me to campus when I was in high school. We attended a step show at the university of Oregon and I got to see campus for the first time. It was quite an experience and perhaps no coincidence that almost a decade later when I attended the university, I joined and participated in Greek life. Mrs. Parker was a constant inspiration to each and every student that sat in her office. You may not always have liked what she was going to say, but you knew that it was delivered with love and the very best of intentions. She let students know she cared, but also that it was their job to do their very best, because no one was going to do it for them. It is a good friend who would have you believe in yourself. Mrs. Parker helped students believe in themselves, for a student, who is far from home, this is priceless.

In addition to the care and tough love, Mrs. Parker was perhaps most well known for her refrain of:

“Speak truth to power”

I heard her say and live this as long as I had the pleasure of seeing her smile. This is why her name is uniquely suited to grace the halls of the University of Oregon. She consistently spoke truth to power. The Black student task force that was instrumental in the founding of this building, took that advice. Many of the students on that task force knew Mrs. Parker and were inspired by her advice to at every turn and opportunity to speak truth to power. Should the university select to honor Mrs. Parker by naming the Black cultural center after her they will simultaneously show that power is listening.

Respectfully summited.

David Spencer

2016 Graduate

Lundquist College of Business – Accounting 

CPA Candidate


Dear President Schill,

First, thank you for your continued commitment to working with current students and alumni to help the University of Oregon better serve Black students. I truly appreciate your time and willingness to engage in continued valuable discourse.

I am are hereby writing to express my support in the Black Task Force’s vision for the namesake of the Black Cultural Center to be named after the legendary Lyllye Parker. I believe hers is an exceptional case that not just meets but embodies all the other criteria and would be particularly inspiring to incoming Black (and all) students.

Lyllye Parker has been a strong advocate for all students at the University of Oregon and has made significant contributions in service and support not just to the school but so many individual students. She has been a light at UO and due to her kindness, resolve, and advocacy, gave a lot of students of color, who didn’t feel safe on campus, a home.

When I came to UO as a freshman in 2009 I was nervous. Finding Lyllye Parker in the OMAS center made me feel immediately connected to campus and gave me a reason to stay. Being a student of color at a predominately white institution doesn’t come without bias and Ms. Lyllye Parker understood that, and used her experiences of personal resilience growing up in Eugene. I myself went to High School in Eugene and hearing her stories made me push even harder.

She has been overcoming the obstacles of racism literally since birth. Her mother had to sneak into Eugene’s Sacred Heart Hospital because it was illegal for African Americans to be born there (and to this day, is the reason Mrs. Parker is listed as “Caucasian White” on her birth certificate despite obviously being African American). While she holds distinctions as the first African American to be born in Eugene and as a member of the first graduating class of Sheldon High School, it’s what she did later in life that has gone on to inspire so many, starting with entering the UO as a true freshman at the age of 40 in 1986. She went on to serve as an academic advisor for 16 years in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success, where she became one of most beloved personalities on campus.

Generations of students see her as family and still talk about the positive impact she has had on their lives. I am sure the number of letters and phone calls and support among alumni that this namesake has received speaks to her impact. She is a tremendous representative of the UO, African Americans, and humanity as a whole, and I believe it would be a missed opportunity for the UO not to seize this moment to honor her contributions. Once again, I appreciate your time and hope you take this recommendation into strong consideration.

I understand the importance of an equitable decision making process, appreciate your forefront leadership, commitment to diversity, and look forward to having this historical building named after one of our Eugene and UO pioneers, Mrs. Parker.

Thank you for your time, 

Olivia Manwarren

The spelling of Lyllye’s name was corrected in this document.


Dear Naming Committee and UO President Schill

Firstly I would like to thank the Black Student Task Force and the University of Oregon for this momentous occasion and amazing opportunity.

I am Jason Floyd, Student Success Navigator of the African American Black Student Success Plan Grant of Lane ESD. I am a University of Oregon Alum and a local son of the Eugene, Springfield area.

I am one of a large number of students who benefited immensely from the intervention and care of Lyllye Parker in her role as advisor and unofficial role of minority retention specialist and surrogate campus mother for students of marginalized communities.

Marginalized communities are systemically ill-prepared in a system that has historically benefited disproportionately from their hard work and efforts as well as provided limited opportunities to gain greater financial freedom, political and social representation and civic support for self-determination. This insidious truth is difficult to articulate to the average person who is not fluent in de-colonized contexts and systemic oppression, but the results of them are experienced by the average person every day. Equity is an issue globally and locally and the majority of citizenry are on the wrong side of it, historically speaking. But Lyllye Parker was so effective in those marginalized communities who were attending the university to subvert a pattern of oppression and attempting to gain liberty and justice through education and empowerment for not only themselves but as representatives of historically marginalized communities, and achieve a similar level of financial and social success that their Caucasian counterparts have enjoyed since time immemorial.

Lyllye Parker’s advocacy work started at her birth, by being born illegally in Sacred Heart Hospital, as an African American child, her birth certificate says White under ethnicity to illustrate the crime. She was born to one of the first Black families to settle in the Eugene area, but not in Eugene proper because it was illegal for them to live here. She is the scion of one of the first Black members of the Human Rights Commission in Mattie Reynolds, and one of the first Black entrepreneurs, co-owner of a saw mill in Lowell, in Sam Reynolds Sr. Lyllye Parkers parents were also founding members of the oldest Black church in Eugene, St Marks CME. Her parents, siblings and marginalized community were parts of a lot more firsts for Eugene that go largely undocumented or lauded as achievements. But that foundation and framework molded and informed Mrs. Parker’s activism, advocacy and overachievement in the role of Academic Advisor for the University of Oregon.

I personally benefited greatly from her services and care. I was a local student raised in both Springfield and Eugene school systems and social programs. My general impression of campus was one of elitism and detachment. I rarely spent time on University of Oregon campus as a younger student, accept for my connection to family members employed on campus which primarily were represented in janitorial and food services. Out of town athletes were intermittently familiar as they were African American and sought out the black community to find comfort in their new jobs as student-athletes in a strange new place. So, I equated the University of Oregon with prestige, status and money, three things in short supply in my day to day experience growing up. When I became a student my evaluation of University of Oregon was echoed in numerous personal interactions, with staff and students. It was an alienating experience even though my upbringing braced me for it. My lack of nepotism and network had also ill-prepared me for the opportunities being at the University presented. I was at a gold rich river without a pan. That is until Lyllye Parker illuminated my horizons.

Her advocacy and advisement for me was holistic. She helped me navigate the technicalities of financial aid, scholarships and funding. She introduced me to like-minded individuals within the staff and student body. Where I saw staff normalizing generations of systemic oppressive practices she saw opportunity for activism and raising of acumen. Where I saw spoiled students detached from harsh realities she saw friends waiting to learn an enriching truth from new experiences. Her fluidly effortless approach to cultural care, emotional support and systemic navigation, made my years at the University of Oregon an exciting enriching experience, whereas it was a daunting, desperate aspiration before her intervention.

The University benefits greatly from its student body, but people like Lyllye Parker make it so that the student body benefits greatly from the University.

I whole-heartedly support the Black Student Task Force’s desire to name the Black Cultural Center after University of Oregon’s living breathing refuge for black students, specifically, but all students in actuality that had the honor to be served by her. Lyllye Parker represents what the Black Cultural Center is for; a refuge for the often ignored, historically misused and yet exceptionally valuable student; the future contributor’s to society that answer societies’ standing disparities and substantiate the significance of a college education. Lyllye Parker is the bed rock of civility and equitable action and a beacon to all students and staff of what excellence looks like in action. A perfect representation of the type of people University of Oregon are capable of producing.

Her personal achievements in the face of consistent opposition and personal grace and nurturing care has cultivated generations of University Alum, of which I am proud to say I am one.

Thank you President Schill for the opportunity to voice my truth in so significant an occasion.

And thank you for recognizing the positive effect naming the Black Cultural Center after the most deserving agent of change, Lyllye Parker, will have on the community at large.

Sincerely 

Jason Floyd

Student Success Navigator. Lane ESD


Dear President Schill,

My name is Frederick Jones and I am writing this letter to express my strong recommendation of Mrs. Lyllye Parker for the namesake of the Black Cultural Center. I achieved a Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Oregon in 2005 and I recall the countless hours of advising and support Mrs. Parker dedicated to me and many other students. This honor couldn’t be bestowed upon a more deserving candidate who embodies the mold and mission of the Black Cultural Center.

While attending the University of Oregon, I observed her dedication to promoting the importance of education and engagement. She encouraged each student to take leadership and ownership of our lives by investing in learning to improve the trajectory and outcome of our lives. Mrs. Parker championed the significance of earning a degree, not just to enhance or lives personally, but the potential to provide an avenue for a “seat at the table”.

In order to make the changes that we desire in our communities, Parker argued that justice and equity becomes a reality by remaining focused on our goals. She engrained this pivotal value in each of our advising sessions as a recipient of the Diversity Building Scholarship. Her longevity and reputation at the University of Oregon strengthens the evidence of the long lasting contribution to the culture of diversity. I believe that Mrs. Parker’s legacy of influence in unsurpassed.  To that end, I recommend that you select Lyllye Parker as the Black Cultural Center designation.

Thank you for your consideration and feel free to contact me if you have further questions.

Frederick Jones 

1015 S 54th St.

Springfield, OR 97478

541-731-3751

joneslamarfred@aol.com


March 28, 2019

To: President Shill

Re: Naming of the Black Cultural Center

First let me thank you for your service to the University of Oregon over the years and your progressive leadership during a difficult time in our country.

I’m writing as a lifelong community member, University of Oregon alum and someone who cares deeply about all things UO. This letter is in regards to the University of Oregon Black Task Force’s request to name the new UO Black Cultural Center in honor of Lyllye Parker. The Black Task Force’s letter was poignant and compelling. I do not intend to belabor their argument. Rather, I would like to briefly discuss the significance that naming of the UO Black Cultural Center would have from a native son from the Black community

I grew up in the River Road / Santa Clara community of Eugene in the 80’s. I went to school in the in the Eugene school district and eventually went to the University of Oregon where I went on to earn my BA, M.Ed, and D.Ed. Needless to say, I spent a lot of time on campus. When I attended UO, I was surprised to find that my presence as a student who was African-American and a native Eugenian made me an outlier. As an undergrad, I did not encounter many with whom I shared cultural experiences. I was not a student athlete, I was not from California, I did not come from a family with means. In short, I did not fit the Black mold. As a result, I did not feel like I mattered. Years later I found, through conversations with other African-Americans raised in Eugene who attended UO, that I wasn’t alone.

I know that my experiences as an undergrad was nearly 20 years ago and recruitment and engagement practices strategically target prospective students of color from local areas. Unfortunately, the stigma of exclusion still persists in the Black community.

The University of Oregon has a timely opportunity to bridge a cultural divide between its institution and local the Black community by honoring a local icon who has done so much for our school and our community. The University of Oregon has an opportunity to break the pattern of looking outward to fill the void of cultural representation on campus; and change the experiences of kids, like me, who will one day attend UO. By naming the new Cultural Center after Ms. Parker you will be sending a message to those kids as well as Eugene’s Black community that says, “We see you, you are part of our story, you matter.”

Thank you for your consideration,

Dr. Iton Udosenata

UO Class of 2003, 2005, 2018

Principal North Eugene High School


Programs surrounding the ideas of diversity and inclusion are what bring people to an institution of higher learning. Community and comfortability throughout their academic journey are what keep them, for the feeling of belonging can make even the most difficult tasks fonder.

Time invested at an institution of higher learning invokes an inevitable self-discovery that shapes the way in which people evolve into their best selves. However, when an environment that is foreign either in location, experience, or both is laced with continuous "isolated incidents" of prejudice, bias, and ultimately blatant racism, one's focus, journey, and right to education is disrupted.

The purpose and strength of the Black Cultural Center is rooted in the belief that safety, community, and comfort are important. These understandings coupled with the inherent hunger for higher education, academic excellence, and cultural comprehension are staples for the center's formation and strength.

Within the history of the State of Oregon, much like the history of the United States of America, there is a common thread of intimidation, segregation, and discrimination. However, this history is also swaddled in the narratives of generational power, courage, activism, community, and love. These are the narratives of those who withstood appalling and abhorrent treatment so that one day, a small city like Eugene, would have the opportunity to be welcoming for Black students far and wide who desired to strive for excellence at the University of Oregon.

A lynching is defined as putting someone to death, without legal authority, by mob action, through hanging. Lynching has historically been used to deter and intimidate Black peoples from pursuing their rights, liberty, and happiness. They were and have been used as an exemplar to keep organizing efforts down against the racism that was bestowed upon us -as if it were a birthright. Regardless of fear and mistreatment, the Black community has progressed and remained tenfold - due to pillars of light and grace, strength and courage, who stood tall and paved the way for all of us who would come after.

Lyllye Parker is the definition of a Pillar. She is a linchpin. Restated, she is someone who has held together. Lyllye is one of the most vital and foundational people and parts of the Black community in Eugene, Oregon. Lyllye has served to build, maintain and foster community even when the storm clouds seemed more constant than mere weather patterns. Lyllye has withstood the worst of society and has remained a crucial life source of encouragement, mentorship, and generational strength.

Lyllye has remained steadfast in her support and commitment to the Black community  and  we find it unfathomable to consider any other who could be better suited to be the namesake of the Black Cultural Center. We, as the Black Law Student Association,  request  that an exception  to the posthumous rule be st;:,ongly considered in regard to naming the new Black Cultural Center after the well-established', and well-deserving Lyllye Parker.

Jessica L. Brown

Black Law Student Association, President


University of Oregon Black Cultural Center Naming Committee and President Schill

Education is the great equalizer. In theory, it is the entity that is supposed to create an upward mobility in life. In reality, that is not the case for many, especially for a formerly incarcerated African-Americans males such as myself. In order for education to be attainable, university leaders must embody their public mission, give self-assurance, affirmative help, and access to comprehensive resources/help for those that come from disadvantaged and modest background. For me personally, the individual that embodied the public mission of our university and affirmed my existence as a human and student, is Mrs. Lyllye B. Parker.

I was incarcerated for 17 years. Prior to attending the UO and earning my bachelors and masters degree, my highest level of formal education was 5th grade (the year I dropped out). Despite this fact, Mrs. Parker never judged and or hesitated to help me. She repeatedly told me how she saw potential in me and how I could reach my potential and earn my degree. I literally worked with and got help from Mrs. Parker every single day. She never got tired of me, never turned me away, never made me feel like I was not intelligent or wanted. It was the opposite. She picked out books for me to read(so my writing/understanding of Black history can improve). She helped me with my homework. She helped edit my class papers. She helped me find and apply for scholarships. Because of her, I earned the Diversity Excellence, non-traditional reentry, and pell grant based scholarships. Most importantly, seeing the work that Mrs. Parker does on a daily basis helped me learn the following important fact about her: For Mrs. Parker, there is no more important objective than making sure that she did everything she could to extend the opportunities of higher education to everyone she comes across in life—the rich and poor; LGBTQUI community. Black, White, Native American, Latino, Asian and every race/religion people identify with. She is model for what an institute of higher education leader should be.

I met Mrs. Parker around 2008. Immediately, it felt like Mrs. Parker embraced as if I was her own son. She was indeed my academic advisor. However, only saying she was my advisor does what Mrs. Parker has done for me, pure injustice. She was and still is my official advisor in life.

After I earned my bachelor’s degree. Mrs. Parker was instrumental in helping me not only apply but get into the UO Conflict and Dispute Resolution Master’s degree program. During this program, there were many times I considered dropping out. I told Mrs. Parker that I was considering dropping out. Mrs. Parker immediately responded and he told me dropping out of school isn't open for discussion. She did not just stop there. For three years, she made it a point to help me get acclimated to the academic requirement and social adjustment process of my master’s degree program. Because of Mrs. Parker, I completed my master's program and graduated in March 2016.

To be transplant, I am an ex-felon that has been ostracized society and many people in the community. However, Mrs. Parker embraced me and encouraged me to move forward. Because of Mrs. Parker, I have now started a successful non-profit organization program, a program that aims to help mentor at risk youth, help ex-felons, and ex-gang members get access to university education. When I started a nonprofit organization Ms Parker volunteered to be the President and treasurer. She has literally been there for me and helped me have a stable non- profit organization. Because of her help, we have 4 students that have went through our program and have earned UO bachelors degrees. of this nonprofit organization.

Mrs. Parker is a hero. She is also one of the greatest advocates for equity/inclusion the University of Oregon has ever been affiliated with (in addition to being an academic advisor, Mrs. Parker was a student at the UO).

Mrs. Parker has fallen ill and is perhaps on her last legs of her life. It is my hope that she will see the day that the UO names the Black Cultural Center after her. With this said, I would like to formally nominate/recommend the UO Black Cultural Center to be the Lyllye B. Parker Black Cultural Center.

Respectfully submitted 

Mustafa Moore